A little story about how I met my cats

Over on Katrina M. Hart’s blog, I’m sharing the story of how I met my cats by chance, one freezing cold January day. I’d love it if you popped over. Thanks for reading 🙂

https://katrinamarie25.wordpress.com/2017/07/17/guest-author-kendra-olson-how-we-met-by-chance/

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My review of Dogged Optimism: Lessons in Joy from a Disaster Prone Dog, a memoir, by Belinda Pollard

Dogged Optimism book cover

I say to Mum, “What do you think? It’s not as if I’m going to buy a puppy today. But you can cuddle one, I’ll buy you some coffee and cake, and then you can come back home for a nap.” She smiles. A glance passes between her and Dad.

When Belinda decided to adopt her first dog, she had no idea what she was in for. Killarney Karinya, named by Belinda for two special places she visited as a child, was an old-fashioned Australian terrier and the runt of her litter. While Belinda had grown up with dogs, she had never raised a puppy of her own. In this delightful memoir, Belinda recounts the difficult but happy years they shared together and how her time with Killarney changed her outlook on life.

Belinda relates several experiences which any pet owner may be familiar with, such as when she worried about Killarney’s health, her concerns about Killarney’s behaviour and training, and the many unexpected messes she suddenly found herself responsible for cleaning up. She also relates several incidents which won’t be familiar to most pet owners as they were unique to her life in Brisbane, Australia–an area known for its deadly reptiles and amphibians. Belinda talks about chasing poisonous cane toads around her yard, in an effort to keep them from getting near her beloved Killarney, who liked to chew on them, and calling the vet on numerous occasions due to Killarney’s being bitten by poisonous snakes. Of course, over time, Belinda learned to strike just the right balance between keeping Killarney safe and letting her learn her own lessons. And Belinda and Killarney had a lot of fun together too, spending time with family, making new friends and having new life experiences. Along the way, Belinda learned to accept the eccentricities of Killarney and the unpredictable nature of life itself.

Belinda’s memoir is heartfelt, funny and, occasionally, sad but it’s ultimately uplifting. Dogged Optimism will resonate with pet owners everywhere, regardless of species.

You can purchase Dogged Optimism as an ebook or in paperback from Amazon.

In the UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dogged-Optimism-Lessons-Joy-Disaster-Prone-ebook/dp/B018VVJ7KS/

In the US: https://www.amazon.com/Dogged-Optimism-Lessons-Joy-Disaster-Prone-ebook/dp/B018VVJ7KS/

Follow Belinda on Twitter: 

Check out her website: http://www.belindapollard.com/

My Review of Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole: Extraordinary Journeys into the Human Brain by Allan Ropper & B.D. Burrell

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“A confused person behaves in a way so foreign to common experience that it can be unnerving, even for professionals. It is an alternate state of being.”

Allan Ropper explores these many various states of being in his fascinating memoir of his days as an eminent neurologist at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. From investigating the effects of transient global amnesia—a dramatic, temporary memory loss—to differing treatments for Lou Gehrig’s disease and Parkinson’s, to the extreme and unpredictable results of various forms of brain surgery and everything in between, this is an absorbing exploration of an underappreciated area of medicine.

Ropper focuses on the patients he meets, as well as his quirky co-workers. These come across almost as characters in a good novel. There’s patient Godfrey, a 55-year-old man who drives all the way from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Boston, Massachusetts before getting stuck on a rotary (roundabout) for nearly an hour before being pulled over by a traffic officer and sent to the emergency room. Then there’s Gordon, a 67-year-old bowling alley manager who loses his job due to increasing periods of confusion, one of which leads him to forget to turn up at work.  When Gordon discovers that his boss has fired him, he decides to take a walk to blow off steam. Having lived in the same small town his entire life, he’s shocked to find the streets becoming unfamiliar. Assisting Ropper in his diagnoses is his ever-capable senior resident, Hannah and the intensely knowledgeable (and very facetious) neurologist Elliot.

Reminiscent of Oliver Sacks’s captivating The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Allan Ropper is remarkable in that he learned about neurological disorders and disease not from utilising state-of-the-art technology—which, of course, is crucial in diagnosing and treating neurological conditions–but from watching and listening to his patients, even when many around him were convinced that those patients were speaking nonsense. It is precisely because Ropper listened to his patients that he was able to write this book.

Although some of the stories in the book are sad, just as many are hopeful and have happy endings, of sorts. Through his study of the brain, Ropper investigates the basis of who we are and what makes us human. What is frightening is how close we all are to falling down our own personal rabbit holes.

Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole: Extraordinary Journeys into the Human Brain is available from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Reaching-Down-Rabbit-Hole-Extraordinary-ebook/dp/B00LRHW99U/